Weeks Bay Foundation Photo Album
Photos of Neotropical Birds - Page 1
 

 

Common Yellowthroat (male)
(Geothlypis trichas)

The Common Yellowthroat usually stays close to the ground, concealed in vegetation. It breeds on the Alabama coast and is fairly common in winter and common spring, summer and fall.

(Photo by Dave Cagnolatti)

 

 

Common Yellowthroat (female)
(Geothlypis trichas)

This species is vulnerable to habitat loss due to wetland drainage.

(Photo by Dave Cagnolatti)

 

 

Common Yellowthroat
adult male
(Geothlypis trichas)
 
(photo by Marlene Cashen)
 
 
 
 

Black-and-white Warbler
(Mniotilta varia)

The Black-and-white Warbler is common spring and fall and rare in winter on the Alabama coast. It feeds by moving up and down the trunks of trees and crawling over and under branches, a foraging behavior unlike any other warbler.

(Photo by Dave Cagnolatti)

 

 

Chestnut-sided Warbler
(Dendroica pensylvanica)

The only North American warbler with pure white underparts in all seasons, this bird most often lives in second-growth deciduous woodlands. It is fairly common in the spring and common in the fall.

(Photo by Dave Cagnolatti)

 

 

Vermilion Flycatcher (male)
(Pyrocephalus rubinus)

This is the most colorful North American flycatcher. The adult male is unmistakable but rare in the winter, spring and fall.

(Photo by Dave Cagnolatti)

 

 

Vermillion Flycatcher (female)
(Pyrocephalus rubinus)

 

Flycatchers spot prey while perched, then hover and catch it in air.

(Photo by Marlene Cashen)

 

 

Hammond 's Flycatcher

Empidonax hammondii

photo by Dave Cagnolatti

This western species is an occasional visitor to the Gulf Coast in the fall.

 
 

American Robin
(Turdus migratorius)

The American Robin is one of south Alabama's most common winter visitors. It is an uncommon breeder in the spring, rare in the summer, and uncommon in the fall.

 (Photo by Marlene Cashen)

 

 

American Robin
(Turdus migratorius)
 
Breeder. Winter foods include fruits of swamp tupelo, camphor-tree, dahoon holly, gallberry, mistletoe, and poison ivy. Some birds occasionally become intoxicated after eating fermented fruits.

(photo by Dave Cagnolatti)

 

Cedar Waxwings

Bombycilla cedrorum

photo by John Borom

Cedar Waxwing flocking behavior has probably evolved at least in part in response to the nature of their diet. Both the flower, fruit and theanimal foods they eat are very patchy in their distribution, and flocking is a more effective means of searching for clumped food resourcesthan individual foraging.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cedar Waxwing
(Bombycilla cedrorum)

This species is common in the winter and spring, occasional in the summer, and rare in the fall on the Gulf Coast. It is named for the wax like tips on its secondary flight feathers. This social bird travels in large flocks.

(Photo by Marlene Cashen)

 

Cedar Waxwing

Bombycilla cedrorum

photo by John Borom

In spring, Cedar Waxwings feed on flower petals.

 

 

Hermit Thrush
(Catharus guttatus)

The Hermit Thrush is often considered to have one of the most beautiful songs of all North American birds. It occurs in woodlands with dense undergrowth.

(Photo by Marlene Cashen)

 

 

Eastern Phoebe
(Sayornis phoebe)

The subject of the first bird-banding experiment in North America, by John James Audubon in 1840, the Eastern Phoebe has provided researchers with much information about longevity, site fidelity, dispersal, and migratory movements.

(photo by Marlene Cashen)

 

 

Rose-breasted Grosbeak
(Pheucticus ludovicianus)
 
Common in spring and fall, and occasional in winter in the Gulf Coast region. Found in woodlands, especially in the canopy.

(photo by Dave Cagnolatti) 

 

 

 

Rose-breasted Grosbeak (above)
(Pheucticus ludovicianus)

Breeding male has rose red breast, white underparts, white wing bars, and a white rump.

(photos by Marlene Cashen)

 
 

Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Female)
(Pheucticus ludovicianus)

(Photo by Marlene Cashen)

 

 

Great Crested Flycatcher
(Myiarchus crinitus)

This flycatcher nests in cavities often excavated by woodpeckers and will nest in bird houses.

(Photo by Marlene Cashen)

 

Orchard Oriole (above)
(Icterus spurius)

Nests are usually high off the ground and may be concealed in clumps of Spanish Moss.

(Photos by Marlene Cashen)

 

Baltimore Oriole (above)
(Icterus galbula)

This beautiful species is attracted to feeders with peanut butter, oranges, or nectar.

(photos by Marlene Cashen)                                    

 

 

Baltimore Oriole
adult male
(Icterus galbula)
 
This species is common  in the spring and fall and rare in the winter on the Gulf Coast.
 

(photo by Marlene Cashen)

 

 

Baltimore Oriole pair

(Icterus galbula)

This was chosen for the 2008 Alabama Coastal BirdFest poster.

 

( photo by Terry Hartley )

 

 

Eastern Kingbird
(Tyrannus tyrannus)

These birds often are conspicuous due to their habit of using exposed perches such as utility lines, telephone poles, treetops, and fences.

(Photo by Marlene Cashen)

 

 

Eastern Kingbird
(Tyrannus tyrannus)

Eastern Kingbird breeds on the Alabama coast and is common spring, summer and fall. It winters from Peru to Bolivia.

(Photo by Dave Cagnolatti)

 

 

Western Kingbird
(Tyrannus verticalis)

Western Kingbird is uncommon in the fall and rare winter and spring on the Alabama coast. Bees, wasps, beetles, and grasshoppers form the bulk of its diet.

(Photo by Dave Cagnolatti)

 

Palm Warbler (above)
(Dendroica palm)

This species is often found in small groups on grassy or weedy open ground, searching for insects and constantly pumping its tail.

(Photos by Marlene Cashen)

 

 

Scarlet Tanager
(Piranga olivacea))

No other bird in North America has the breeding male's unique plumage of a rich scarlet body with black wings and tail. In the molt following the breeding season, the male retains his black wings and tail, but his plumage becomes a mixture of green, yellow, and red patches, later becoming dull green and yellow, appearing similar to the female bird.

(Photo by Marlene Cashen)

 

Scarlet Tanager

(Piranga olivacea)

The breeding male's body plumage is searing and luminescent in direct sunlight, glowing even in the shade of the canopy, where it forages slowly for fruit and insects.

 

 

Scarlet Tanager
(Piranga olivacea)

The female is greenish-yellow, with darker wings and tail and white wing linings.

(Photo by Dave Cagnolatti)

 

 

Prothonotary Warbler
(Protonotaria citerea)

For centuries of ecclesiastical history, the prothonotary, who is legal advisor to the pope, has worn yellow vestments, as the cardinals have worn red. The story goes that the early Catholic settlers in the Southeast name this bird.

(Photo by Marlene Cashen)

 

 

Ash-throated Flycatcher
(Myiarchus cinerascens)

Dr. Bill Summerour found this specimen in south Baldwin County in the fall 2004.  We only have about 20 odd records of this species in Alabama.


 

 

 

Painted Bunting
(Passerina ciris)

The Painted Bunting is fairly common here in migration, recorded more often in spring, probably because of the beautiful plumage of adult males.

Photo by: David Cagnolatti

 

 

Painted Bunting
(Passerina ciris)

The female Painted Bunting is lime green above and a lemony yellow-green below.

(Photo by Dave Cagnolatti)

 

Prothonotary Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler
(Protonotaria citerea)

The Prothonotary Warbler is a stocky, bright yellow warbler with bluish wings and tail. The song is a series of ringing notes: sweet, sweet, sweet, sweet, sweet. It is our only warbler that nests in cavities. Preferred habitats are forested wetlands.

 

Summer Tanager


Summer Tanager

(Piranga rubra)
  
  

In the spring and fall of each year, hundreds of bird species make the incredible journey between South and Central America and North America. Their flight path carries them to the shores and estuaries of the Northern Gulf Coast.

 
Summer Tanager (above)
(Piranga rubra)

The female varies from orange to greenish overall. The male is bright rosy-red overall. They eat mostly bees and wasps and often raid wasp nests and beehives.

(photos by Marlene Cashen) 

 

Summer Tanager female

(Piranga rubra)

This arboreal forager often sallies out after a bee or wasp, removing the stinger before eating.

(photo by Terry Hartley)

 

Gray Catbird
Gray Catbird

(Dumetella carolinensis)
  

Studies by the National Audubon Society and Partners in Flight show a general decline of Neotropical migrant bird species in Alabama by 56 percent. Some species have declined by as much as 70 percent. A major factor in this decline is habitat loss. Many birds need the coastal zone for resting, breeding, and feeding. Natural areas like the Weeks Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve provide precious havens for tied and hungry migratory birds.

 

Gray Catbird
(Dumetella carolinensis)
 
The Gray Catbird is common in the fall and fairly common winter and spring.

(photo by Marlene Cashen)

 
Wood Thrush
Wood Thrush
(Hylocichla mustelina)

The Wood Thrush has become a species of conservation concern and is a symbol of the decline of Neotropical songbirds in the forests of eastern North America. This species, along with many others, faces threats on both North American breeding and Neotropical wintering grounds.


Wood Thrush
(Hylocichla mustelina)
 
Breeder. The Wood Thrush forages on the ground in thick undergrowth, looking for berries, insects, spiders and earthworms. Despite conservation efforts, neotropical migrants like the Wood Thrush are experiencing record low populations.

(photo by Dave Cagnolatti)

 

Hooded Warbler
Hooded Warbler

(Wilsonia citrina)

photo by Marlene Cashen

The Hooded Warbler winters from eastern Mexico to Panama. It breeds in Alabama in swamps and moist woodlands, where it generally stays hidden in dense undergrowth and low branches. This species is common at the Reserve in the spring and summer and fairly common in the fall.

Indigo Bunting
Indigo Bunting

(Passerina cyanea)

The Indigo Bunting winters from central Mexico, Cuba, and the Bahamas south to Panama. It breeds from Canada to Northern Florida. This species is common at the Reserve in the spring, summer and fall.

 

Indigo Bunting
(Passerina cyanea)

The five and one half inch breeding male is indigo blue overall.

(Photo by Dave Cagnolatti)

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