Weeks Bay Foundation Photo Album
Photos from the Kurt G. Wintermeyer Boardwalk

 

White-Topped Pitcher Plant
(
Sarracenia leucophylla)

The 2--3 inch flowers droop from an erect scape and are composed of 5 maroon petals and sepals.

(photo by Marlene Cashen)

 

White-Topped Pitcher Plant
(
Sarracenia leucophylla)

The tall, conspicuous, white-topped pitchers give this species both its common and scientific names. Leucophylla literally means " white leaf ".

(photo by Marlene Cashen)

 

 

White-Topped Pitcher Plant
(Sarracenia leucophylla)

Pitcher plant flowers produce superior ovaries, which are easily seen below the expanded style and stigma.

(photo by Marlene Cashen)

 

 

White-Topped Pitcher Plants
(Sarracenia leucophylla)

The flowering season is from early March to late April

(photo by Marlene Cashen)

 


White-Topped Pitcher Plants 

(Sarracenia leucophylla)

The large flower has deep red petals and a sweet odor.

(photo by Marlene Cashen)

 


Pale Pitcher Plant

(Sarracenia alata)

The pitchers have a pale yellow-green color and the flower petals are creamy to yellow-white. This species was transplanted in the Weeks Bay Pitcher Plant Bog  from a bog in Mobile County that was "developed ".

(photo by Marlene Cashen)

 


White-Topped Pitcher Plants (Sarracenia leucophylla)

Pitcher Plants are fascinating carnivorous plants found only in bogs in the eastern United States. Coastal Plain bogs are a threatened habitat, once covering thousands of acres in Alabama. They have been reduced to tiny pockets because of suppression of fire, drainage of habitat and chemical runoff from agriculture. The entire pitcher is a modified leaf in the shape of a tube. A hood covers the opening and helps keep rainwater out which can dilute the digestive enzymes inside and helps trap insects. In some species the hood is closed over the opening allowing only smaller insects to enter. In other species the hood is more vertical and wraps around the opening. This allows the different pitcher plant species living in the same bog to catch different insects so there is less competition for food.

 

 

Buckeye
(Junonia coenia)

One of our most strikingly colored butterflies, the Buckeye flies swiftly if disturbed.

Photo by Marlene Cashen

 

 

When visiting the Reserve, take a walk along the Kurt G. Wintermeyer Boardwalk at the pitcher plant bog, and remember that your membership in the Foundation is important because it helps protect this Coastal Plain bog and helps support environmental education.

 

White-Topped Pitcher Plants
(Sarracenia leucophylla)

The white-topped pitcher plants along the Kurt G. Wintermeyer Boardwalk have a curious pattern of two crops of pitchers a year. The spring and fall pitchers are perfectly timed to capture insects.

 

 

White-Topped Pitcher Plant
(Sarracenia leucophylla)

The bright coloration of the pitcher and the secretions of nectar along the margins of the hood and rolled lip lure ground and flying prey to the pitcher opening.

 

 

 

White-Topped Pitcher Plant
(Sarracenia leucophylla)

 The inside of the lid is lined by stiff, downward-directed hairs, which encourage descent and discourage ascent.

 


Love Bugs

(Plecia nearctica)
are small black flies. Two flights occur in south Alabama each year - the spring flight during later April and May and a second swarm during late August and September. The brown pitchers in this August photo are full of lovebugs.


 

 

 

 

Love Bugs in Dangerous Territory.

 

 

 

Glades Lobelia
(Lobelia puberula)

The strongly three-lobed lower lip of these attractive blue flowers lure pollinating insects in October.

 

Goldcrest
(Lophiola aurea)

An almost complete covering of fine white glistening hairs with small bright yellow flowers make this plant conspicuous along the Kurt G. Wintermeyer Trial in the early summer.

 


Whitetop Sedge
(Dichromena latifolia)

Unlike most members of the sedge family, whitetop produces showy inflorescence with bracts that resemble flowers. The true flowers are minute and hidden in the scales of small spikelets clustered tightly at the tips of the triangular stems. This plant can be seen along the Kurt G. Wintermeyer Trail from April through August.

 

 


Grass Pink
(Calopogon tuberosus)

The Grass Pink is one of few orchids that does not rotate its flowers 180 degrees during development, so the lip of its flower is on the uppermost segment. It can be seen along the Kurt G. Wintermeyer Trail in the spring.
 

 

Grass Pink

( Calopogon tuberosus )

photo by Bill Summerour

The genus name derives from the Greek kalos , meaning " beautiful," and pogon, meaning " a beard," in reference to showy hairs that adorn the lip of the flower. 

 

Pale Grass Pink

( Calopogon pallidus )

photo by Bill Summerour

The Pale Grass Pink is distinguished from the Grass Pink by slender leaves less than 1/4 inch wide, smaller and usually paler flowers.The flowers may be white or dark pink.

 

 

Rose Pogonia
(Pogonia ophioglossoides)

This dainty orchid can be seen at the Kurt G. Wintermeyer Trail from April through June.

 

Spreading Pogonia Orchid

(Pogonia bifaria)

photo by Bill Summerour

The bloom season for this orchid is April-May. It occurs in pitcher plant bogs throughout the region.

 

Rose Pogonia Orchid

( Pogonia ophioglossoides )

photo by Bill Summerour

This delicate,somewhat low-growing orchid is a common component of pitcher plant bogs across our region. 

 



Pine Lily
(Lilium catesbaei)

Pine lilies occur in wetlands, savannahs and bogs. They can be seen along the Kurt G. Wintermeyer Trail from August through September.

 

 

Blazing Star
(Liatris sp.)
and
Eastern Black Swallowtail
(Papilio polyxenes)

This plant can be seen along the Kurt G. Wintermeyer Trail from July through October.

 
 



Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
(Papilio glaucus)
Males are yellow with black tiger stripes. They feed on nectar and are most attracted to flowers that are pink in color. Males patrol the bog for receptive females.
 
 

 

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus).
The female has two forms: one yellow like the male and the other black with shadows of dark stripes. Hindwing of both female forms has many iridescent blue scales and an orange marginal spot. On the underside of forewing of both female forms the row of marginal spots has merged into a continuous band.

 

 

Eastern Tiger Swallowtails
(Papilio glaucus)
Shown mating attached to
Sweetbay
(Magnolia virginiana)
Females lay eggs singly on host leaves such as sweetbay.

 
 

 

Gulf Fritillary
(Agraulis vanillae)
Because caterpillars eat passion flower foliage, both caterpillars and butterflies contain a poisonous chemical, and their predators soon learn to leave them alone.

 

 

Monarch
(Danaus plexippus)
Monarchs are capable of flying 2,000 miles from Canada to Mexico and back again to the southern United States. Millions migrate every autumn, often stopping to rest and feed on nectar.

 

 

Hummingbird Moth
(Hemaris thysbe)
This moth (two inch wingspan) hovers over flowers in full sunlight, producing a buzz with its wings similar to but softer than that of a hummingbird similarly engaged. There are two generations a year.

 

 

Long-Tailed Skipper
(Urbanus proteus)

The very beautiful long-tailed Skipper is considered a pest by farmers because the caterpillar attacks cultivated beans and is known as the "Bean Leaf Roller". There are usually three or more generations a year.

 
Polka-dot Moth
Polka-dot Moth
(Syntomeida epilais jucundissima)

Many animals are brightly colored so predators will know they are poisonous or sting or just taste bad. This very attractive moth resembles a wasp with its iridescent bluish/black body and wings that have white spots, and a red-tipped abdomen. Although the oleander is known to be toxic, with chemistry similar to the digitalis toxin, Polka-dot Moth caterpillars relish this plant exclusively. Adult moths emerge from cocoons, mate, lay egg and die within nine days.

 

 

 

Golden-Silk Spider
(Nephila clavipes)

During the day this beautiful three inch long female hangs head downward from the underside of the web near the meshlike center. She preys on flying insects and repairs the webbing each day. The male is only about one half inch long. This is a late October photo.

 
Bog Burning

 

 

Periodic burning, properly controlled, can greatly prolong the life of a bog.

 
Bog Burning

 

 

A fast surface fire is a necessary process to reduce competition from woody plants and to rejuvenate the fertility of bog soil for pitcher plants and other wildflowers.

 

Narrow-leaved Sundew

( Drosera intermedia )

photo by John Borom

Members of this genus have stalked glands on the leaves. these glands exude a clear sticky secretion which aids in the insect-catching ability of the leaf. The flowering season is June to August. Look for this plant in wet areas. It will grow into the water and sometimes over the surface in dense mats.

 

Bachelor-button or Candyroot

( Polygala nana )

photo by John Borom

This plant is two to six inches tall, and blooms from March- October, sporadically through the winter. The specific epithet, nana , means " dwarf ".   

 

Orange Milkwort

( Polygala lutea )

photo by John Borom

Polygala is Greek for " much milk ", that and the common name are from the belief that cattle which grazed on the plants would produce more milk. It is also known as orange candy root because the exposed roots smell like wintergreen candy. It can be seen from April to September.

 

Gulf Purple Pitcher Plant and White-topped Pitcher Plant

( Sarracenia rosea ) and ( Sarracenia leucophylla )

photo by John Borom

Pollen is sometimes exchanged between pitcher plant species and hybrid pitcher plants are produced.


Pitcher Plant Hybrids

photo by John Borom

These beautiful pitcher plants are probably a cross between the Gulf Purple Pitcher Plant and the White-topped Pitcher Plant.They are uncommon, but can be found scattered throughout the bog. 

 

Gulf Purple Pitcher Plant

( Sarracenia rosea )

photo by John Borom

Pink flower petals and upright hoods set this species apart from other pitcher plants. It was long considered to be a variant form of the Purple Plant ( S. purpurea ). It has also  been referred to as ( S.purpurea var. burkii).  In 1999 its taxonomic rank was changed to that of a new species with a restricted distribution to the central portion of the East Gulf Coastal Plain.

 

Cinnamon Fern

( Osmunda cinnomomea )

photo by John Borom

Cinnamon Fern produces two kinds of leaves or fronds: a few slender, erect, cinnamon-colored spore-bearing fronds that soon wither and disappear and the broad, tall, pinnate, green foliage fronds, that make this fern so attractive. This photo was taken April 8, 2007.

 

White-topped Pitcher Plants

(Sarracenia leucophylla)

photo by John Borom

Early spring pitchers. April 8, 2007.

 

White-topped Pitcher Plant

( Sarracenia leucophylla )

photo by John Borom 

Catching insects April 8, 2007.

 

White-topped Pitcher Plant

( Sarracenia leucophylla )

    photo by John Borom

This photo was taken in early April 2007.

 

Dew-Threads or Threadleaf Sundew

( Drosera tracyi )

photo by John Borom

The 12-20 inch leaves are erect, filiform and covered with short, pale green, transparent hairs that exude a sticky fluid that aids in the capture and absorption of small insects. The leaves dry up and die back during the winter. Winter buds called hibernacula form, and with the return of proper growing conditions new growth arises in the spring.

 

Dew-Threads or Threadleaf Sundew

( Drosera tracyi )

photo by John Borom

Flowers are borne on tall scapes and only a single flower is typically open at any one time. Buds of developing flowers are arranged in a drooping raceme.

 

Dew-Threads or Threadleaf Sundew

(Drosera tracyi)

photo by John Borom

Though the flowers appear only in the spring, the leaves are evident much of the year and are covered with transparent hairs that exude a sticky fluid.

 

Dew- Threads or Threadleaf Sundew  

(Drosera tracyi)

photo by John Borom

A stand of Dew-Threads is a very impressive sight on a dewy morning when the sun is shining through the plants.It is sometimes considered a variety of Threadleaf Sundew ( Drosera  filiformis v. tracyi ) but is currently regarded to be a separate species.

 
 
 
Copyright © 2000 Weeks Bay Foundation